Helping You Cope With The Difficulties Of Asthma

 

 

Having an asthma attack can feel like a death sentence. No matter how much you try, you just cannot pull enough oxygen into your lungs, to be okay and breathe. You feel as if you are going to burst if you don’t get some oxygen in your body. Asthmatics work long and hard to avoid ever having this feeling. Read on for tips to keep your asthma attack at bay.

A great tip that can help you get over an asthma attack is to try drinking a few cups of coffee. Coffee can help when you’re having an asthma attack because the caffeine opens up the airways. With your airways opened, you’ll be able to breathe much better.

If you get a bad cough that isn’t clearing up, ask your doctor if it could be related to your asthma. Asthma can trigger both coughs and bronchitis. The treatment for asthma trigger bronchitis is different from the treatment for a normal cough, and finding out if asthma is part of the issue will help you get relief for your cough quickly.

It is important that you keep your home and work environment clean if you have asthma. Dust and germs can worsen your asthma symptoms and cut off oxygen to your lungs. Because dust accumulates rather quickly, it is recommended that you dust your furniture and appliances at least once a week.

Medications that will help you control symptoms when you have an attack are oral corticosteroids and bronchodilators. Bronchodilators, usually referred to as “rescue medications”, are usually inhaled but also come in liquid, tablet, or they are injectable. These are the most popular forms of ‘rescue medications’ that you can get.

If your doctor prescribes you a preventative inhaler, use it! Consider your preventative inhaler to be part of your daily pharmaceutical regimen, just like any other medication. If you don’t use the inhaler, the medication it contains can’t help you. Plus, if your doctor can’t trust you to take your medications, they can’t effectively treat your asthma.

Wear a covering over your mouth and nose when you go outdoors in the colder weather. A shawl, scarf or muffler would work well. This lets the air warm slightly before you breathe it in. Cold air can be a nuisance and breathing it has actually proven to trigger asthma attacks. This is especially true for younger children who have severe or moderate asthma.

If you have asthma and you need pain relief, you should use acetaminophen, like Tylenol, instead of aspirin and NSAIDs (Non-Sterodial Anti-Inflammatory Drugs) such as ibuprofen. NSAIDs, such as Advil, Motrin and Aleve and aspirin can often make asthma worse. Stick with acetaminophen for pain and you should be fine.

The tips you use from this article, will vary based on what triggers your asthma attacks. The important thing is that you take the tips that cover your triggers and start to apply them to your life. Talk to your doctor, in order to get help isolating what your exact triggers are, so you can start working to prevent your next asthma attack.