You Can Feel Better With These Helpful Asthma Tips

 

 

A diagnosis of asthma can affect all areas of your life, whether you yourself have been recently diagnosed with the condition or perhaps if you are caregiver to an asthmatic. Combined with the information and instructions given by a licensed healthcare professional, these tips and tricks can be the first step to relief of asthma symptoms.

Think about getting a flu shot. If you have asthma regularly, your lungs have more risks have getting infected. A flu shot should protect your lungs from common types of infections. If you have a child with asthma, you should definitely get them a flu shot to prevent them from developing any severe lung infections.

Use natural remedies for your asthma. While doctor-prescribed medication might be necessary to prevent deadly attacks, a healthy diet will help to improve everyday life. Beta carotene’s promote healthy mucus membranes in your mouth and nose which help to reduce the chances of serious asthma attacks.

Have your home inspected at least once a year for mold and other spores. Many asthmatics, especially children, can have their asthma exacerbated by exposure to these allergens. Living in a home full of mold spores can even trigger repeated asthma attacks to the point of permanently damaging a child’s respiratory system.

Get annual flu vaccinations for your entire family. Do everything you can to avoid a respiratory infection if you have asthma. To do this you must take extra precautions against getting sick, like washing your hands often and getting vaccinated every year.

Have your home inspected at least once a year for mold and mildew if you have asthma. As bad as mold and mildew is for healthy people, it is even worse for people with asthma because it can decrease lung function and make breathing harder. If you suspect you do have mold in your home, be sure to let your doctor know.

Do not try to “tough it out” if you notice an oncoming asthma attack or a general worsening of your symptoms. Your doctor prescribed you a rescue inhaler for a reason; use it. If your symptoms seem to be getting worse overall, you should speak to your doctor about adjusting your medication plan.

Join a local support group of other asthma sufferers to gain additional information or tips on living with asthma. Others may have experienced specific triggers similar to yours and may offer beneficial suggestions for either avoiding them or lessening their effects. If you move to a new community, a support group can be an invaluable source of information on trigger substances common in the area.

Create and follow a written asthma action plan. This plan should include all of your asthma medications, including rescue inhalers, dosages and times to take them. Having a written plan makes it easier to follow your treatment plan, which will result in better control of your asthma.

Now that you have become more familiar with the basic principles and hidden ways of coping with this respiratory condition, you can be well on your way to providing relief from the key symptoms of asthma, especially shortness of breath. You can also use your newly discovered knowledge to identify the main triggers of asthma.