How You Can Live Better With Asthma

 

 

Asthma is a frightening and potentially life-threatening condition that affects an estimated 17 million American men, women and children every year. By following advice given by your doctor, combined with the useful and relevant information found in this selection of tips, you can combat the symptoms and triggers of asthma attacks.

A great tip that can help your child deal with asthma is to inform as many people as possible about your child’s condition. You should tell their teacher, the babysitter, and everyone else that has the responsibility of looking after your child. They’ll understand your child’s needs and they’ll be able to help.

Although it may seem trivial to most people, it is important that you live near your doctor or an emergency room if you have asthma. Living in a rural area can mean that paramedics cannot get to you in time to save your life if you have a severe asthma attack.

It is wise for all asthma patients to purchase peak flow meters for their home. These machines can help you check your lung function so that you know if you are in danger of having an asthma attack. These machines are inexpensive and certain insurances will actually pay for them.

Asthma can range from a small annoyance to an all-out, life-threatening condition. To help prevent Asthma attacks, keep moderation in mind, especially when engaging in outdoor activities in hot weather. Hot and humid air can make breathing difficult for anyone, but for someone with Asthma, it can be deadly. If you have work to do outside, try and choose to do so early in the morning or late in the day and avoid the mid-day sun and heat.

If tobacco smoke is a trigger for your asthma symptoms, not only should you not smoke, but you should also avoid places where people smoke. Tobacco smoke leaves a film behind, so even if there is no fresh smoke in the air, the chemicals left behind may still trigger an asthma attack.

Protect yourself against breathing in cold air that aggravates your asthma by wearing a scarf that covers your nose and mouth. This will warm the air before it gets in your lungs. Cold air can trigger severe attacks, especially for young children.

Emotional issues, high stress and anxiety can also cause asthma symptoms. These may be treated with medications and or therapy, as well as eating properly, getting a good amount of exercise and making sure that you are getting a good eight hours of sleep or more, each and every night.

Stay indoors when grass is being mown or clipped if grass pollen is one of your asthma triggers. Because lawn care stirs up the pollen, being in the vicinity when the grass is being cut can cause an asthma attack. Instead, remain indoors with the windows and doors closed to lessen your exposure to the pollen.

To live and cope with the symptoms of asthma, your physician can opt to write you a prescription for medicated inhalers and oral solutions. As part of your therapy, you can take the next steps yourself by using the advice and information that you have just read about to combat asthma.